Climate Change and the Bleak Future of My Hometown in Bangladesh

12 Jun

During my childhood, as soon as it turned dark outside, my father would become frantic and check whether all the windows and all the outlets to the outside world were closed. I could hear his voice from across the house shouting, “We cannot let any of the mosquitoes get inside! It takes only one bite to kill you!” Despite my father’s utmost effort to keep the mosquitoes out of our house, one of these sneaky little creatures would sometimes manage to get inside. What ensued then was my mother’s panic as she would cover me in insect-repellent creams.

To an American reader, everything I have described until now may seem unusual, but it was a very ordinary evening at any household in my hometown of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Deadly mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue are common in Dhaka so people live in constant fear of mosquitoes. My family, like any ordinary family, was just trying their best to stay alive.

The sky of Dhaka at evening.

I wish I could tell you that the situation has improved since then, but unfortunately, climate change will increase the spread of mosquito-borne diseases in Dhaka. Bangladesh is one of the countries most vulnerable to the effects of climate change both because of its geographical location and economic conditions (1). It is a low-lying, tropical country bound by the Bay of Bengal in the south, by Myanmar in the Southeast and by India in the North, East and West. A developing economy that is densely populated, its 158,570,535 citizens live in an area of 147,570 km2 (2). As a frame of reference, Bangladesh is approximately the size of Iowa, but has about half as many people as the entire United States.

Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka, where I was born and raised, is the most crowded city in the world (3). The impending effects of climate change will surely exacerbate the occurrence of infectious disease and cause potentially significant public health challenges. Infectious diseases spread by mosquitoes, such as malaria and dengue, are endemic to the tropical Southeast Asian region. Dhaka’s poor infrastructure, such as a lack of drainage systems, waste disposal and the abundance of slums, create suitable habitats for mosquitoes and aggravate the effects of climate change on the spread of diseases (4).

Human-caused climate change is responsible for an increase in the global mean temperature, a phenomenon also known as global warming. When I was a child, every summer when I complained of the heat, my mother recalled the time right after I was born in the summer of 1998. She fondly reminisced about the tantrum I had thrown as a newborn in that sweltering hot weather and the trouble she had to endure to pacify me.

Later, my mother would come to find out that the temperature in 1998 was a record high at that time (5). To all my later complaints about the weather, she would say that the heat was nowhere as bad as that of the summer of 1998. However, as I got a little older, and especially during my teenage years, the summers became so unbearable that I never felt like stepping outside of the house. For the first time, I heard my mother say that every summer now reminded her of the summer of 1998 (5).

For the months of May through September, an increase of 1℃ has been observed from 1976-2008 (7). This increasing trend in temperature is causing seasonal patterns to change in Bangladesh (7). Normally, the Bengali calendar has 6 six seasons that last for two months each.

The seasons of Bangladesh in my memory have always changed in such a timely manner that it would make you wonder whether nature was following a clock. In my childhood, summers had sunny skies, an enjoyable warmth and the red hue of krishnachura flowers that brightened all of Dhaka. Summers used to be distinct from monsoon, which followed summer. The temperature used to drop during monsoon. However, nowadays summer and monsoon are converging into one season as monsoon starts earlier than before and the high temperatures of the summer prevail for a longer period of time.

The streets of Dhaka in the summer months lined with Krishnachura.

An increase in temperature generally facilitates the growth of the mosquito population. Warmer environments also speed up the maturity of the parasites they carry, which means that more mosquitoes also means a greater potential for disease transmission. Unfortunately, this increase in mean temperature favors both Anopheles mosquitoes, which transmit malaria, and Aedes aegypti, which transmit dengue fever (6).

Aedes Aegypti mosquito, the carrier of dengue fever.

Anopheles mosquito, the carrier of malaria.

 

 

 

 

 

Lab experiments show that at consistent temperatures of 32-35 ℃, the incubation period of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is shortened by a full week from its incubation period of 12 days at 30 ℃ (7). As temperatures increase in Dhaka then, we can expect an increase in the incidence of mosquito-borne diseases as the incubation period of mosquitoes decrease. In addition, average temperatures during winter are expected to increase by 1.4 ℃ by 2030 (7). This changing weather pattern will shorten the length of the reproductive cycle of mosquitoes, thus increasing the rate of population growth (8). Mosquitoes are not only helped by the increase in temperature, but also by the increased amounts of rainfall in Dhaka, which experiences the tropical monsoon climate.

I have always had a love-hate relationship with monsoon. Even though the roads were muddy, and sometimes I was stuck inside the house all day during monsoon months, it was still a glorious time of the year. I was always excited about the loud rhythmic rattle of the rain and the clear green of leaves that you could see right after the rain stopped. But monsoon also meant knee-deep water that you sometimes had to wade through to get to school and being stuck in traffic for long hours because the rain water got into a car’s engine.

Life in Dhaka during the monsoon months.

The arrival of monsoon also evokes fear in the hearts of many because it is the season when the outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases occur all over Dhaka. Analysis of rainfall from 1976-2008 showed an increasing trend in the amount of rainfall during monsoon (7). There has been a corresponding increase in outbreaks of dengue from June to August (2). Data recorded over 2008 and 2009 shows that the number of dengue cases increase from around 50 to above 800 following the arrival of the monsoon during the months of June to August.

This increasing amount of rainfall creates pools of stagnant water which become optimal breeding sites for mosquitoes. An increasing population of mosquitoes allows for a faster spread of diseases (8). The increasing amount of rainfall coupled with the increase in temperature will act together to increase the rates of mosquito-borne illnesses in Dhaka.

Monthly dengue cases averaged over 2000–2010, showing seasonal incidence (7). [Img: Sharmin et al. (4)]

Not only are the temperature and level of rainfall increasing, but the occurrences of weather extremes such as floods are also becoming more frequent. Bangladesh is located on a river delta plain fed by 230 rivers. In the north, the glaciers in the Himalayas are melting, while in the south, the sea levels of the Bay of Bengal are rising. Both the water from the melting glaciers and the rising sea levels make Bangladesh vulnerable to frequent flooding.

A severe flood occurs in Bangladesh every four to five years, but this frequency is expected to increase with further climate change (2). A study has found that if total precipitation increases by 5%, an increased 20% of area in Bangladesh is likely to be flooded. In the past, outbreaks of dengue fever have occurred during a flood. Flooding causes water congestion in Dhaka which creates breeding sites for mosquitoes, thus mosquito populations grow which leads to an outbreak of dengue. As frequencies of flood increase with climate change, incidences of dengue fever is also expected to increase (4).

Streets of Dhaka during a flood.

The overcrowding of Dhaka is also another factor that affects the spread of mosquito-related diseases. Being born and raised in Dhaka, I have always known Dhaka as overpopulated. While growing up, I was used to frequently being stuck at red lights for 15 minutes. Whenever we visited our family members who lived 20 minutes away, our rides never took less than an hour. However, lately, it is getting worse as the population in Dhaka has been exponentially increasing because of incoming “climate refugees.”

Climate change has affected the rural agriculture-based economy of Bangladesh as changes in temperature, level of precipitation, and seasonal patterns damage crop production. This adverse effect on agriculture has forced a migration the rural areas to Dhaka, the economic hub of the country. These “climate refugees” live in slums, which lack good sanitation systems, a safe drinking water supply, and proper cooking and health care facilities (9). These substandard living conditions create the perfect condition for the spread of mosquito-borne disease.

A shortage of reliable fresh, clean drinking water results in residents storing what water they have in containers such as drums and earthen jars. Unfortunately, these containers are not sealed, and so the Aedes aegypti mosquito lays its eggs in them, precipitating outbreaks of dengue in the city. As climate change continues to affect agriculture in rural areas more people will migrate to Dhaka. Without an improvement in both Dhaka’s infrastructure and the living conditions in these slums mosquitoes will have the ability to infect a greater number of people (4).

Stagnant water bodies are breeding sites for mosquitoes.

When I have trouble falling asleep at night, sometimes I wonder about the fate of Dhaka. Lying in my college dorm bed in Massachusetts, with not even a single mosquito in sight, I think about what will become of these mosquitoes in Dhaka. Could they wipe out the entire population of Dhaka in the next 20 years? Or are they going to mutate to become some super-mosquito creature which will take over the world?

Sometimes I have a dream, or rather a nightmare, that I am walking through the streets of Dhaka in a quarantine suit and everybody else is dressed similarly. In my dream, I cannot really recognize the faces of anyone because millions and millions of mosquitoes are buzzing in the air. You may say that my dream is too far-fetched, but how much better could the reality be?

-Bushra Tasneem (’20) is a Mathematics and Computer Science double major from Dhaka, Bangladesh. She enjoys reading poetry and taking walks in the woods in her free time. She originally wrote a version of this piece for ENG 119 Writing Roundtable This Overheating World.

Works Cited:

  1. Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.; IPCC;New York, 2013; pp 28-62
  2. Dastagir, M.R.; Modeling recent climate change induced extreme events in Bangladesh: A Review; Weather and Climate Extremes. 2015, 7, 49-60.
  3. World Economic Forum. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/05/these-are-the-world-s-most-crowded-cities/ (accessed April 13, 2018).
  4. Sharmin, S.; Viennet, E; Glass K.; Harley, D; The emergence of dengue in Bangladesh: epidemiology, challenges and future disease risk. Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2015, 109, 619-627.
  5. Stevens, W. Earth Temperature in 1998 Is Reported at Record High.The New York TImes, Dec 1998.
  6. Yi, H.; Devkota, B.R.; Yu, J.; Oh, K.; Kim, J.; Kim, H.; Effects of global warming on mosquitoes & mosquito-borne diseases and the new strategies for mosquito control. Entomological Research.2014, 44, 215-235.
  7. 7.Basak, J.K.; Titumir, R.A.M.; Dey, N.C.; Climate Change in Bangladesh: A Historical Analysis of Temperature and Rainfall Data. Journal of Environment. 2013, 2, 41-46.
  8. Bostan, N.; Javed, S.; Nabgha-e-Amen; Eqani, S. Tahir, F. Bokhari, H.; Dengue fever virus in Pakistan: effects of seasonal pattern and temperature change on distribution of vector and virus. Review of Medical Virology, 2017, 27.
  9. Molla N. A.;  Mollah K. A.; Ali G.; Fungladda W.; Shipin O.V.; Wongwit W;  Tomomi H; Quantifying disease burden among climate refugees using multidisciplinary approach: A case of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Urban Climate, 2014, 8, 126-137.  

House Sustainability Challenge 2018

29 May

The House Sustainability Challenge culminated its first chapter with a final winner: the Drying Racks team (Yolanda Chigiji ’21, Julianne Borger ’21, Emma Krasky ’21, Sadie Wiese ’21, April Hopcroft ’21 and Sophie Guthrie ’21). Congratulations! This group presented a practical alternative to drying machines and made it available to everyone in their house (Morrow-Capen) on a trial basis. Here’s how it went- they displayed several prototypes made out of inexpensive, recycled materials, such as bamboo, to their house community and encouraged their creation through small workshops. As a back-up, in case a DIY drying rack was not within the skillset or comfort zone of students, they made sure to have some standard designs on each floor of the house. These racks were managed with a sign-out system so residents on each floor are aware of who was using which drying rack at any given time. In case of a lost or damaged frame, the person, whose details was on the sign-up sheet, was contacted and the situation was assessed. Through the use of portable racks, the students were able to reduce the number of dryers in use over their trial period by almost 200 cycles in both houses.

The House Sustainability Challenge, sponsored by Smith’s Conway Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Residential Life, CEEDS, the Office of Campus Sustainability, and The Design Thinking Initiative, held its final challenge on April 20th, allowing each group to present their proposals and pilot programs to the judges. The winning team was awarded $1,000 while the remaining finalists received $250 for their respective houses. The winning team’s design for a campus-wide drying-rack program will be implemented next semester.

The runner-up team projects were:

  • A proposal to reduce water consumption through shower-flow regulators in Comstock House (Katie Knowles ’19 and Karime Gutierrez ’20)

  • A project to increase the heating efficiency in Chase and Ziskind House by recording real-time room temperatures and creating a communication channel between students and Facilities Management to better regulate temperature (Yuqing Geng ’21 and Erika Melara ’20) 

The House Sustainability Challenge was developed as a way to encourage students to use their expertise as residents to help envision and design innovative ways of solving real life issues on campus in an environmentally sustainable manner. Design solutions must also be economically feasible and replicable across the residential houses.

-Erika Melara, CEEDS intern

Controlled Rot: Growing Mushrooms at MacLeish

27 Apr

“When life gives you lemons, make lemonade!” goes the proverbial phrase used to encourage making the best of what one has. At the MacLeish Field Station we have lots of forest that provides much shade. So why not grow food that does not require full sun—such as mushrooms? In April, eight students spent an afternoon inoculating logs with both blue oyster and shitake mushroom spawn. Their work was part of an agroforestry demonstration project being established this year at the Field Station.

Alexandra Davis ’18 and Lilly Williams ’18 drill logs in preparation for inoculation.

Inoculating logs is relatively simple. Holes drilled into recently cut logs are filled with mushroom spawn and then sealed with cheese wax.

Tracy Rompich ’21 inoculates logs with shitake spawn.

Tess Abbot ’20 and Molly Peek ’18 seal the spawn in the logs with cheese wax.

After being labeled, the logs are all stacked in the shadiest part of the forest. Over the 12 months the fungi will grow and spread throughout the logs, becoming well established, and hopefully begin fruiting mushrooms that we can harvest next summer!

 
Preparing hot chocolate for all the volunteers on the beautiful spring day are,
from left, Lily Williams, Molly Peek, Alexandra Davis, and Diana Umana ’19.

Sustainability Challenge 2018 – Heat Efficiency

23 Apr

For this year’s House Sustainability Challenge (2017-2018), I teamed up with my classmate, Yuging Geng (’21), to design a project that could potentially increase the environment-friendly initiatives on campus. Living in Massachusetts, cold, winter-like makes up much of our academic year, making our heating systems a potential source both for energy savings and for improvement of personal comfort. Before moving to Ziskind, where I currently live, I was in Sessions House where my room felt significantly colder. However, closing my window disrupted my only source of fresh air, with the result that I often had to put on extra layers of clothes or purchase additional blankets to keep myself warm and comfortable. In Yuging’s house, Chase-Duckett, she noticed that her friends had variable temperatures in their rooms. For example, one of Yuging’s friends felt uncomfortable because it was too cold, while another friend’s room felt significantly warmer, sometimes even too warm. Based on these experiences, when the call went out for the Sustainability Challenge, we decided that students would benefit from a system in which they could view their dorm-room temperature so they could make better informed decisions about when to contact facilities to request a change in temperature.

We decided to wire in a breadboard, a temperature sensor (DS18B20), to Raspberry Pi 3 and code it, using Python, to collect temperature data and display it on a website (i.e. livestream). An additional benefit of using Raspberry Pi is that no changes in the infrastructure would need to be employed, as its performance mainly depends on Wi-Fi. Since we are both international students, we calculated the temperature in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. We envisioned this project as an early tool to raise awareness not only about campus heating systems, but also about the lack of ventilation during the summer. Take a look at our prototype website: https://melaraerika.wixsite.com/sustainchallenge for more info!

This year’s House Sustainability Challenge was sponsored by the Conway Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, the Design Thinking Initiative, the Office of Campus Sustainability, CEEDS, and the Office of Student Affairs.

-Erika Melara ’20 is a Scorpio who is happy that winter is finally fading away!

Smith Sugaring

27 Mar

Spring is well and finally here! We’ve been celebrating its arrival with students in New England fashion- by taking a bunch of them to a local sugar shack for a tasty breakfast with the locals- and by taking others out to the MacLeish Field Station to learn how to first identify and then tap maple trees so we can gather their sweet sap. As the days slowly get longer and the daily temperature swings signal that it is time for the trees to send food to their flower and leaf buds, the slow and steady drip of sap has gotten faster and faster, filling the buckets easily each day.

Check out the video about this that our intern Ellen Sulser ’18 made and posted on FaceBook.

On Sunday we capped off the season by hosting our inaugural Smith Sugaring event. We brought to campus all of the sap we had been gathering and set up near Chapin House.

It was a perfect day to hang out and watch the water boil off and share with passers by the wonders of making maple syrup.


Some seniors (environmental concentrators, all) stopped by to check out the parklet that we had set up nearby.

And lots of other people (200 or so by our count) stopped in throughout the day to visit, check out our set-up, learn about the process, and taste some fresh maple sap or syrup. We made our very first MacLeish maple syrup here on campus, and a good time was had by all. Sweet success!

Another Earthbound Shake Up

9 Feb

On Tuesday, January 23rd the Pacific tectonic plate slid a tiny amount under the North American tectonic plate causing a magnitude 7.9 earthquake southeast of Kodiak Island in the Gulf of Alaska. The epicenter of the earthquake is depicted on the map below from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS). The red line on the map depicts where the two tectonic plates meet, forming the fault line. As the Pacific and North American tectonic plates meet each other they are moving about 59 mm each year. This is why earthquakes are common in the Pacific-North America plate boundary region south of Alaska. Over the last 100 years, 11 other magnitude 7+ earthquakes have occurred within 600 km of the January 23rd, 2018 earthquake. This earthquake is shown as an oval on the map, not a single point. That is because this earthquake was generated when an area of the plates 230 km long and 30 km wide strike and slip over each other.

So why do we care about an earthquake that occurred over 3,600 miles away? Did you feel it? You may not have felt it, but the seismograph at our Ada & Archibald MacLeish Field Station located about 10 miles from Smith College campus felt the shock waves (see below). The seismograph at MacLeish is part of a vast network of stations across the entire country recording earth movements. We may think of the ground as terra firma, but when two tectonic plates rub against each other the ground wiggles like brown pudding.

To get a sense of the ripple effect of the earth from the earthquake, click on the map below to watch the vertical motion video map of the Alaskan earthquake. In this video, red dots represent vertical motion up and blue dots represent down vertical motion of the ground.  It is clear that the clash of the plates sent shock waves across North America and beyond. There was our beloved terra firma rippling like water.

Submitted by Paul Wetzel, Environmental Research Coordinator, CEEDS

With information from the USGS and IRIS DMC (2010), Data Services Products: GMV The Ground Motion Visualization, doi:10.17611/DP/16325361.

Animal Tracking at MacLeish

24 Jan

Hi and happy New Year! My name is Hayley Reifeiss and I’m a senior Biology major who just spent her first J-Term on campus. With graduation fast approaching I wanted to take advantage of J-Term classes while I still could. One of the classes I took was Animal Tracking with Scott Johnson. It was a three-day (two days because of snow) class where we learned how to recognize and interpret signs of wildlife in order to track them. I wanted to take the class to learn a bit more about the local fauna and surrounding environment. I was also hoping to practice some outdoor skills that might be useful for a Biology career doing fieldwork.

The first day of class was primarily spent learning about the different types of tracks and walking patterns. For example, canines and felines walk in an arrangement called “perfect stepping” so their prints look like there’s only two feet because the back ones land in the same place as the front ones. You can tell the difference because a canine print will have four toes in a parallel arrangement with the nail imprint visible while feline prints have four toes more splayed out and no nail imprints. But because the print isn’t always perfectly preserved animal trackers will often rely on how the prints are arranged as well as other signs such as scat and surrounding smells to make an ID. On our first day we used those signs to identify fox activity around the sports fields. While walking by paradise pond we noticed a musky smell and found scat in an obvious placement (in this case on top of a manhole) which is how canines mark their territory. We knew it was a fox by the specific smell and the material found in the scat. There was also signs of its digging.

The winter landscape at MacLeish.

On the second day of class we went to the MacLeish Field Station to test our skills in a more rural environment. MacLeish was full of animal activity and we found numerous tracks in the fresh snow that had fallen the day before. There were signs of squirrels, foxes, and deer, which are relatively common, but the most impressive animal we tracked was a bobcat -whose prints we followed for several hundred meters in order to be positive in our ID. It seems that this particular bobcat has made MacLeish its home because we found tracks almost everywhere we went.

The bobcat track at MacLeish (left) next to my hand print (right) for scale.

We also found a porcupine den -recognizable by the surrounding tree type, scat, and the most obvious sign: the quills. We tracked the porcupines to the trees which they climbed up as evidenced by the urine markings on one of the branches. It was really cool to experience the forest in this way, and at the end of day I think we all came away from the class with a greater appreciation of the animals we share this land with.

The tracking class takes a break in the camp shelter at MacLeish.

-Hayley lives in Tenney House while at Smith. She is originally from Plymouth, MA.

Migrant Justice comes to Smith!

14 Dec

Hi! I am Diana one of the interns at CEEDS. I will post more about myself soon, but for now I wanted to share about a recent event that I went to:

On Thursday, November 16, Abel Luna, a speaker from Migrant Justice gave a talk at Smith, which was co-hosted by two campus orgs: Smith Students for Food Justice (SSFJ) and Organizing for Undocumented Students Rights (OUSR).

Migrant Justice is a farm worker-led organization that works to improve working conditions for dairy farmers in Vermont, a state which produces a lot of ice cream and cheese. They organize migrant workers mostly from Mexico and Central America who, in the words of Luna, “do the work that most people don’t want to do.” Their mission is to build the voice, capacity, and power of the farm worker community and engage community partners in organizing for economic justice and human rights.

After campaigning for 2.5 years, Migrant Justice finally succeeded in getting Ben & Jerry’s to join their Milk with Dignity program. By joining the program, Ben & Jerry’s signed an agreement to establish labor standards and an enforcement strategy.

Luna, the speaker, explained their organizing strategy as a spiral model which starts at the center with farm  worker’s experiences.

Migrant Justice’s organizing model.

He also mentioned the way in which conversations about food justice often revolve around food being local and organic. While Vermont farmers tend to pride themselves in saying this, and use these such terms to market their products, they rarely include fair conditions and wages for their workers in their definition of food justice.

The Real Food Challenge, however, does include conditions of farm and food chain workers in their definition of real food. Smith signed the Real Food Challenge in the fall of 2016, and Dining Services continues to work to increase the amount of “real food” it purchases. Smith students brought Migrant Justice to campus to talk more about food justice, and highlight their concern that Smith continue to commit to purchasing food that is fair and real in all the ways as defined by the Real Food Challenge.

Some of the SSFJ and OUSR students with Luna after his talk.

You can find more information on migrant justice online or the Real Food Challenge and Smith’s involvement online.

-Diana Umana (’19) is a philosophy major living in Wilder House. She is a CEEDS intern, active in SCOPES and OUSR.

Proxy Carbon Pricing at Smith?

11 Dec

Environmental Science and Policy major Breanna Parker (’18) recently presented an interim report on her thesis “Proxy Carbon Pricing at Smith: An economic transition strategy to lower carbon emissions through informed decision-making”. The inspiration her work, as she explained it, was the report which was released this spring by the college’s study group on climate change. The report provided a series of recommendations to develop and internalize constant carbon emissions such as a carbon proxy price to help guide major problems in budget management along with other decision-making processes. Smith College currently emits 27,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide annually. While there are already a variety of new projects underway at Smith that will be more energy efficient (e.g. the new library), in order to significantly reduce our emissions, Parker recommends that the college apply proxy carbon pricing. With this honors thesis, Parker seeks to engage Smith stakeholders in order to standardize and incorporate the acceptance of carbon emissions into the decision-making process.

The specific mechanics of applying a carbon proxy is vital for a sustainable approach. Ultimately, this is an additional design criterion that people can use to evaluate different options. For instance, when evaluating a new purchasing offer, we first consider the quantities of carbon emissions obtained, then we modify the units to compare it with other options, and apply a proxy over the lifetime or life-cycle of a project since carbon emissions will continue to be released as the product is used. To this evaluation, we also add the initial and maintenance costs. With this method the complete carbon emissions cost can be used in comparison with other choices in order to select the most energy efficient and affordable plan. To help the audience better understand the process, Parker used the example of purchasing a light bulb. Which is a better choice- incandescent or LED? The incandescent light bulb has a cheaper initial cost, but has an expected lifetime of only about 1 year. In comparison, the LED light bulb has a lifetime of approximately 22 years. Since bulbs generate additional costs each time they must be replaced, even before it gets turned on, the incandescent starts out with a higher hidden cost. Moreover, incandescent light bulbs use more energy, which cause more carbon to be emitted. In comparison, the LED light bulb, although it has a higher initial purchasing cost, has a slower operating system that requires less energy and produces fewer carbon emissions. This, combined with its longer replacement interval, makes it the better option. This simple example highlights the importance of considering the entire lifetime cost of a system or component, which is not always considered.

Parker then spoke about some of the ways that Smith might be able to benefit from using proxy carbon evaluation. One example was in the renovation of Washburn House. When thinking about heating systems, there are two main approaches: geothermal or natural gas boilers. The latter is more common given its lower initial cost. Nonetheless, if the cost comparisons include long-term maintenance  and carbon emissions, the natural gas boilers have significantly higher life costs and higher carbon emissions, suggesting that a geothermal approach would be a better choice. She noted that carbon proxy evaluation can be used in other situations, too, and it is important and interesting to also consider the vehicles used at Smith. For instance, vans rely on gasoline, but with the availability of an electric parking station near campus, over the long run a transition to electric cars would mean lower carbon emissions and lower monetary costs.

Other universities have implemented different methodologies to acknowledge and lower their carbon emissions. For instance, Yale University has a carbon fee ($30) that is applied to all administrative units individually (buildings). Through some modifications in their infrastructure, they are able to read their carbon emissions levels, so if an academic building has lowered their carbon emissions, then they are able to gain a monetary revenue for other projects. Princeton University has a proxy carbon price similar to what Smith is considering. In this method, a tool was created for administrators to record the initial costs, operating and maintenance expenses, and apply a proxy carbon price to their projects. Swarthmore College has a combination of both a carbon fee ($100) and a proxy carbon price calculator.

Parker hopes that like other colleges and universities, Smith College will acknowledge its carbon emissions and move towards using carbon proxy evaluation for future projects so that the full cost- both environmental and financial- is part of the decision making process.

-CEEDS Intern Erika Melara (’20) is an Engineering major. She comes to us from El Salvador, where she enjoys eating pupusas and going to the beach.

HCC-ALC: Owl Pellets Lab

6 Nov

After an owl hunts, how does it eat its prey? With a fork and a knife? Although modest, owls prefer to keep it simple by swallowing their prey whole. Impressive as it sounds, Jessika, a student at HCC- Adult Learning Center in Holyoke, asked, “Does that mean owls can digest bones and feathers?” The answer is…no! The undigested parts form a tight pellet that is later regurgitated. Gross! But not as much if it’s sterilized.

This past Wednesday (Nov. 1), through STEM Outreach, Thomas Gralinski, Ellen Sulser (‘18) and I (Erika Melara ‘20) visited the learning center and introduced the concept of Food Chains and Food Webs to a small class of pre-GED adult learners. After delivering a baseline presentation, we prepared a lab activity to dissect owl pellets. We particularly focused on the barn owls which usually prey on insects, reptiles, bats, and small rodents. An interesting fact about these owls is that they can hear a mouse’s footsteps from 30 yards away! This is fascinating, considering most of us can barely hear our names being called across the room.

Although some students were reluctant at first, by the end of the lab activity, they were determined to find and classify each of the bones to later boast about their owl’s appetite. Personally, I was bewildered about how some of the bones (i.e. skulls) were intact and well-preserved. Take a look at some of the pictures!

-Erika Melara is a Scorpio, who comes from El Salvador, where she enjoys eating pupusas and going to the beach.